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We have 18 Amazing #YoungPhillyLeads Finalists. Meet them on October 5.

Tickets - #YoungPhillyLeads - Square

 In partnership with Forbes Under 30 Summit, YIP will be highlighting the people, projects, and organizations whose ideas and work are remaking Philadelphia.

This coming Monday, October 5, #YoungPhillyLeads Awards will recognize the young Philadelphians that have taken their #whyilovephilly game to the next level. Those people will have the opportunity to share how they are shaping, creating, and supporting their communities.

We are pleased to announce the group of finalists who will be recognized during the awards program.

#YoungPhillyLeads Finalists

Education 

Government 
  • Isaiah Thomas, Dir. Community Affairs, Office of Controller
  • Julie Wertheimer, Deputy Dir. for Policy, Programs & Admin, City of Phila.
  • Kellan White, Community Engagement & Special Events Manager,  Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown

 

Start-Up / Entrepreneurial 

 

Nonprofit

 

Civic Engagement 

 

Media

 

Join us next Monday, October 5 at the #YoungPhillyLeads Awards to hear from all of the finalists above on how they are moving Philly forward.

All finalists will address the audience by giving a short pitch as to why they deserve to win their respective category.  Each audience member will be able to vote in a live text poll to choose the winner in each category.  You helped us nominate, so now is your chance to help us pick the winners!

Tickets are $30 per person, ticket price includes beer, wine, and refreshments.  Discounted 10-packs of tickets are available for $250. Get Your Ticket Today!

September 22nd | Posted In Events, Millennial

#YoungPhillyLeads Awards: The Next Level of #whyilovephilly: Tell us WHO you love, Philly.

Nominations

Calling all community builders, instigators, activists, connectors, leaders, rabble-rousers: we want to share your best ideas with the world in October.

In partnership with Forbes and the Under 30 Summit, Young Involved Philadelphia (YIP) will be highlighting the people, projects, and organizations whose ideas and work are remaking Philadelphia. On October 5th, the #YoungPhillyLeads event we will be recognizing the young Philadelphians that have taken their #whyilovephilly game to the next level. Those people will have the opportunity to share how they are shaping, creating, and supporting their communities.

This is YIP’s official call to nominate the people behind those efforts! We are seeking nominations from the following communities; Education; Government; Startups; Not-for-Profits; Civic; and Media. At the event on October 5th, nominees will have the opportunity to share their work. The audience, through live polling, will then decide who takes home a #YoungPhillyLeads award.

So, take a deep breath and help us identify which of Philly’s individuals and organizations are taking the kind of action that moves their community (and Philadelphia) forward.

Click Here to Submit Your Nominations

When making your nomination, please share any relevant links, project descriptions, and reasons why you think your nominee should be considered worthy of being a Young Philly Leader. Please note that all nominations are anonymous.

**The deadline to submit nominations is September 28th, 2015**

September 10th | Posted In Millennial, Politics

Framing the Problem: Lack of Young People in Politics

Only 53% of millennials get this reference

Only 53% of millennials get this reference

There is a lack of engagement in Philly politics on the part of young people. Two big, simple facts back that up.

The Big, Simple Facts Section

Fact 1: 18-29 year-old voter turnout has been abysmally low in primaries and non-presidential general elections.

Former YIP President and bona fide political smarty-pants, Josh McNeil, wrote the following and I, recognizing his sagacity and my own laziness, will simply cut-and-paste it here: Read more

April 25th | Posted In Millennial, Politics

Young Candidate Spotlight: Jen Devor

One in an occasional series highlighting young Philadelphians who are running for office.  Young Involved Philadelphia does not endorse any candidate for any office, and this post should not be considered an endorsement of or opposition to any candidate. But we do encourage all young Philadelphians to get more involved civically and politically in their city. To that end, we will occasionally profile young candidates and ask them how and why they decided to get involved. 

Name: Jen Devor

Running for: Democratic Committee Person for the 36th Ward, 37th Division (Point Breeze).

Why Philly?  Philadelphia is really important to me and I just really love the city. I have had all my major life  milestones in Philadelphia – I came to school here – I went to the University of the Arts, I fell in love in Philadelphia, had a baby in Philadelphia, launched my career in Philadelphia. And I love how much access you have to everyone and everything. It has all that I need in where I want to live and I want to make a contribution here and give back.

Read more

April 23rd | Posted In Millennial, Politics

Young Candidate Spotlight: Tom Nardi

One in an occasional series highlighting young Philadelphians who are running for office.  Young Involved Philadelphia does not endorse any candidate for any office, and this post should not be considered an endorsement of or opposition to any candidate. But we do encourage all young Philadelphians to get more involved civically and politically in their city. To that end, we will occasionally profile young candidates and ask them how and why they decided to get involved. 

Name: Tom Nardi

Running for: Democratic Committee Person in the 58th ward, 39th Division.

Why Philly? I was born and raised in Philadelphia. The grade school I went to is in my ward, a large portion of my family lives in my ward. It’s home for me. I’ve spent some time in other places – working on campaigns in South Dakota, Delaware, other parts of Pennsylvania. But, Philadelphia – Northeast Philly – it’s where I want to be. And I want to be involved in the community, so I’m running for Committee Person.

What do you do? Political organizer, political staffer by trade. [Currently, I’m] call time manager for my uncle, who doubles as my state senator, Mike Stack, who is running for Lieutenant Governor.

Why did you decide to run? My grandfather was ward leader in the 58th for almost 40 years. I grew up at his knee. My uncle is the ward leader now. We’ve been involved with the 58th ward going way back – politics is in the lifeblood of my mom’s side of the family. Staying involved in the community is important to me. So when, four years ago, the opportunity first came up to run for Democratic Committee Person in my neighborhood, I jumped on it. You get to go out every day, meet new folks, meet old folks who’ve been there a while, meet the people in your neighborhood. For me, its people I grew up with: “Hey, you were in scouts with my son” or “My daughter when to high school with your brother”.

Any advice for other young folks considering a run for office? If you’re interested in running, go out and do it. My grandfather always gave the advice “no one makes you the guy – you have to go out and be the guy.”  No one really taps you on the shoulder and says, “Hey, I think you should do this.”  Without you expressing the desire to do it.  So if you have to the drive to run for something, whether it’s democratic committee person, state representative, city council – figure out what you need to win and then go do it, because the most important piece of politics is being there and doing it.  So many folks, even in elected positions, are really absent in what they do.  When people talk about young upstarts that came and took over places, it’s because they showed up and did it.

What challenges have you faced, if any? Fortunately for me – rather unfortunately for small-d democracy – I am running unopposed. There are only 2 people running in my division. Last time I ran, there were 3 people running and I was able to win.

What is it like to be a younger person in Philly politics? There is a weird dynamic in politics when it comes to generations. You get the old guard that loves to see young people involved. If you walk into a room and you’re 25 and no one is under the age of 50, they’ll love that you’re there, but you’ll still have to prove yourself.

When people complain about “government doesn’t hear our voices”… politicians respond to the people who show up. It’s no coincidence that politicians every time you hear a politician open his or her mouth, its about seniors – seniors turn out to vote.  Young people don’t turn out to vote so much.  So if we want change, we got to make it – we got to show up.

April 15th | Posted In Millennial, Philadelphia, Politics

Young Candidate Spotlight: Kris Walski

One in an occasional series highlighting young Philadelphians who are running for office.  Young Involved Philadelphia does not endorse any candidate for any office, and this post should not be considered an endorsement of or opposition to any candidate. But we do encourage all young Philadelphians to get more involved civically and politically in their city. To that end, we will occasionally profile young candidates and ask them how and why they decided to get involved.

Name: Kris Walski

Running for: Democratic Committee Person for the 25th Ward’s 1st Division (Port Richmond).

Why Philly?  I grew up here – I was born in Philadelphia on the 4th of July and have lived in Port Richmond all my life. I am a graduate of St. Joe’s Prep and Penn.

What do you do?  Right now, I’m working on Tom Wolf’s campaign for governor. Before, I worked for City Council with the Committee on Global Opportunities and the Creative/Innovative Economy. I actually found that job through YIP – at a career fair at Penn, I spoke with [Advocacy Committee member] David Laegan, who introduced me to Chris Pienkowski of Councilman David Oh’s office.  [Ed. note: Councilman Oh chairs the Committee on Global Opportunities and the Creative/Innovative Economy].

Why did you decide to run? I started attending local community civic group meetings, which made me more interested in getting involved in my neighborhood. That’s also where I met my ward leader, Thomas Johnson, for whom I started volunteering, collecting petition signatures for the Democratic primary.

Any advice for other young people considering a run for office?  I went to YIP Events – the Ward Politics 101 event in particular. I also got involved with my local community groups. Attending those meetings gave me the opportunity to meet people who care about the neighborhood.

What kind of challenges have you faced?  In local politics, there is a large generational gap. I think more young people would get involved if they knew how and more about the issues. For example, my ward leader said he was happy to see young people get involved. We need to connect people who want to get involved with willing ward leaders. And if someone is more civically-focused, and less politically-focused, there are a ton of groups, like the North Kensington Community Development Corporation, who have opportunities to get involved.

March 26th | Posted In Millennial

Millennials at Work: Young and Callow, Like Their Parents

The headline says it all.  This week, American Public Media’s Marketplace is teaming up with the Gray Old Lady to produce a series of stories about the economy.  The first: “Millennials at Work: Young and Callow, Like Their Parents“. You should read it (or, do like I did, and listen to the Marketplace podcast).

Socrates complained about Plato’s generation, and Plato complained about Aristotle’s, and Aristotle complained about Alexander and so on. One generation grousing about the next reads like the Book of Chronicles.  And when I one day complain about whatever we’ll call the next generation (Post Millennial? Gen Z?), I’ll be a hypocrite just like people who complain about my generation. Just a few years ago, Gen Xers were shiftless, lazy and disengaged. Before them, the Baby Boomers were too busy really listening to Aoxomoxoa to worry about jobs. Of course, we tend to think quite highly of the Greatest Generation, but they were probably known as the Greatest Disappointment to WWI vets. It shouldn’t surprise anyone that young people are brash and lack experience.

Fact is, humans are hard wired to look for causal reasons for why things are and to make contrasts between themselves and the Other. We accept narratives rather than think critically, especially when those narratives explain our own superiority. The tired narrative that millennials were coddled as children by soccer trophies for participation makes a ton of intuitive sense, but not any actual sense. if the little trophies we got – and threw out – really made us complacent with mediocrity in anything, you’d think it would manifest itself most in sports; just talk to any young Phils’ fan about the upcoming rebuilding year and you’ll see where you can stick your complacency.

Perversely, the old guard loves to say how easy this generation has it compared to them. Next time you hear someone complain about “Kids these days”, just remind them they didn’t have it as bad as these Four Yorkshiremen. Then tell them to shut up.

March 19th | Posted In Millennial

18 People Who Gave New Meaning to “Better Late Than Never”

Well guys, I gave it some thought, and I’ve realized that I don’t want to be an attorney.  Unfortunately, I only gave it some thought after three years of law school and two years of practicing law.  So now, on the wrong side of 30, I’m trying to start a new career.

While I’m floundering, my friends all seem to be enjoying unmitigated success.  Perusing Facebook or LinkedIn is like navigating an ego minefield – at any second, a friend’s promotion can explode across my computer screen, demolishing whatever pathetic sense of accomplishment I had from finishing yet another cover letter.

At times like this, its useful to remember that history is rife with individuals who stumbled down a dead-end career before finding success elsewhere or didn’t take off until later in life. Even though millennials aren’t supposed to care about the past, I can’t help but feel better after reading about these folks who gave new meaning to the cliché “better late than never”.

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